Ecuador: Violent Strikes Reveal Democracy on the Brink

Ecuador: Violent Strikes Reveal Democracy on the Brink

Fiscal Necessity at Odds with Perils of Entitlement
ecuador strikes
Eight people died during the strikes, 1,340 were injured, and 1,152 were arrested. (MaJos)

Ecuador: Violent Strikes Reveal Democracy on the Brink

1170 658 Paz Gómez

On October 1, President Lenín Moreno announced six austerity measures and 13 economic reforms in line with an aid agreement struck with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). A key change repealed 40-year-old subsidies on low-octane gasoline and diesel fuels that cost the government around $1.3 billion per year (7 percent of its annual spending).

Opposition movements immediately rejected the measures and called for nationwide strikes and marches. Following several days of social unrest, on October 12, the United Nations and the Ecuadorian Catholic Church managed to mediate dialogues between the government and the Indigenous movements and labor unions.

Backgrounder Content

  1. What triggered the protests in Ecuador?
  2. Was former President Rafael Correa really behind them?
  3. Why did the protests escalate so quickly?
  4. Why did Ecuador need an IMF bailout?
  5. What has been the impact of the protests?
  6. What are the current status of the conflict and the dialogues?

Ecuador: Violent Strikes Reveal Democracy on the Brink (four pages) Download

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Paz Gómez

Paz Gómez

Paz Gómez is the Econ Americas policy analyst. She is cofounder and academic coordinator of Libre Razón, a liberal think tank in Quito, Ecuador. She holds a bachelor's degree in international relations and political science from San Francisco University of Quito. Follow @PazenLibertad.

All stories by:Paz Gómez
Paz Gómez

Paz Gómez

Paz Gómez is the Econ Americas policy analyst. She is cofounder and academic coordinator of Libre Razón, a liberal think tank in Quito, Ecuador. She holds a bachelor's degree in international relations and political science from San Francisco University of Quito. Follow @PazenLibertad.

All stories by:Paz Gómez